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What Are mAbs

What Are mAbs

HOW THE TREATMENT WORKS

Monoclonal antibodies, or mAbs, are proteins that help your body fight off the virus that causes COVID-19.

The one-time infusion can take 20 to 70 minutes. Alternatively, an injection treatment (four injections under the skin) may be given in a single visit. Both options have an observation time afterward, are safe, and authorized by the FDA.

mAb treatment may keep you from getting sicker and may even keep you out of the hospital.

WHO CAN GET TREATMENT?

WHO CAN GET TREATMENT?

You may be eligible if you just tested positive for COVID-19 and your symptoms began in the past 10 days, OR if you’re not fully vaccinated or are immunocompromised and have been recently exposed.

WHO CAN GET TREATMENT? CHECK MY ELIGIBILITY

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

If you’re in a high-risk category and you’ve had symptoms for 10 days or less and tested positive, OR if you are high risk and you’ve been exposed to COVID-19, are not fully vaccinated or are immunocompromised, you may be eligible.

A mAb infusion is a one-time treatment that is safe and lasts 20–70 minutes, with an observation time afterward.

A mAb injection is a one-time treatment (four injections under the skin) that is safe and lasts a few minutes, with an observation time afterward.

Talk to your doctor, and go to Crush COVID Treatment Locations to find a treatment location near you.

This site lists treatment centers near you. We add new locations often, so please check back.

You can also visit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Combat COVID site for resources on available treatment options.

You may be eligible for mAbs even if you haven’t tested positive. The treatment is now being used as a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP).* If you’ve had recent exposure to COVID-19, are in a high-risk category and you are not fully vaccinated or are immunocompromised, you may qualify for mAbs.

The FDA has authorized the monoclonal antibody treatment for prevention of COVID-19. Visit their website for the most recent updates: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-authorizes-regen-cov-monoclonal-antibody-therapy-post-exposure-prophylaxis-prevention-covid-19

*Prophylaxis with REGEN-COV is not a substitute for vaccination against COVID-19.

Scientific studies showed that high-risk COVID-19 patients treated with mAbs had a 70% reduction in relative risk for progression to severe disease and/or hospitalization compared to patients who did not receive mAbs.

Yes. You must follow isolation requirements to protect yourself and others.

Yes, but you should wait 90 days after treatment to get the vaccine.

Yes. If you get COVID-19 despite vaccination, you may receive the treatment.

The treatment is covered by health insurance, although there may be some costs for patients. If you don’t have coverage, it may be free. Ask your provider.

On March 17, 2021, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the Health Equity Initiative to increase access to COVID-19 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy for high-risk patients in underserved and disadvantaged communities across the country.

More about the program

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